Everest

Everest: A Comparative Study of Height and Human Achievement
One of the more serious information design challenges I’ve taken on is this poster showing the theme human versus Nature. It’s a historic rivalry pre-dating cats and dogs, Red Sox and Yankees, or even Wile E. Coyote and the Roadrunner.
This infographic compares the struggle between man and nature through height in two ways: one, through the successful summiting of the 50 highest peaks in the world and two, through building increasingly tall structures. Mount Everest, the tallest peak in the world, is used as the paragon of height for all height achievement comparison.

Everest

Two parallel timelines track the history of Mount Everest (above) and tallest man-made structures during the same period (below).

Timeline of Everest
The history of Everest is documented through short vignettes of key events below the line, and graphing the number of successful summits (in blue), and number of attempts resulting in deaths (in red) in each year.

Timeline of Man-Made Building Structures
During the same period of time as the timeline above, world-record-breaking man-made structures are documented with heights drawn to scale. Mount Everest is faintly depicted behind the timeline as a reference point for comparison.

Everest

Detail of Mount Everest geo-located in comparison with the world’s 50 highest peaks. The line formed by connecting Everest’s location with its illustrated peak becomes the scale measurement of the peak at 8,848 meters. The heights of the remaining 49 peaks are ranked along this line in comparison. Peaks ranking from 1-10 are set in red for emphasis.

Everest

Detail
The top 18 paths taken to successfully reach Everest’s summit.
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Opacity
death rate of the path (the darker the line, the higher percentage of deaths).

Thickness of the path
the number of attempts using the path (the thicker the line, the more popular the route).